Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 6.09.27 PMAfter working in several disaster recovery efforts, we noticed that each organization (church, NGO, or government agency), plays their own role in a recovery effort. Some churches focus specifically on cleaning up debris, some NGO’s focus solely on collecting donations, and some government agencies focus on public safety announcements. Connecting all of the organizations on the same system improves the resilience of the community and will help the town recovery faster in future emergencies.

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Moore Donations Map

Click or see below for an interactive map.

One of our goals here at Recovers is to help communities be more prepared for disasters by learning from our data and sharing that knowledge with the rest of the world. This past year, our software was used to help the recovery efforts in Moore, OK, after the EF-5 tornado ripped through the town on May 20, 2013.

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Hurricane Sandy donation item distribution

Recovers has been used in several disasters over the past year including Hurricane Sandy , the Oklahoma tornadoes, the Alberta Floods, and the Idaho Wildfires. Part of our mission is to change the way disasters happen by learning from our experiences. A key part in this process is the collection and analysis of non-personally identifiable information, or as we will refer to it, “non-PII” data.

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volunteerIn recent disasters, I have seen an inspiring amount of goodwill and kindness pour into affected areas from all around the country. These volunteers and donations are essential for rebuilding a community. However, the huge rush of people and items can often overwhelm local organizers and slow the recovery effort. Naturally, organizers are very hesitant to turn you away during a recovery effort. So let’s keep from overwhelming them – try to follow these four rules and help the recovery effort run a little smoother.

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They may bit a little furry, but they’re part of your family. Do you know what to do to keep your pet safe? Here are a few tips:

  1. Identification: Keep a collar and up-to-date ID tags on your pet at all times, or get your buddy microchipped. Also keep a few current photos of your pet on your phone or online. Most of the pets with identification can be returned to their owners right away after a storm. Those without can spend weeks in shelters or be given to a foster family permanently.  Continue reading

file0001534313837Hurricanes are giant, ocean-based, spinning storms that can carry wind speeds of 150 mph or more. You can’t recognize a hurricane from the ground. They are so big — often hundreds of miles across — that we can only recognize their distinct swirling shape and eye with radar and satellite imagery. However, if they come onto land, there’s no mistaking how powerful and dangerous they can be. The United States is under threat from hurricanes every year, and scientists continue to improve forecasting models to help keep us safe.
 
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I think of myself as a pretty resourceful guy, and handy with duct tape and a pair pliers. When a deer charged my car and knocked my rearview mirror off a few months ago, I was able to fix it myself just fine. But as a new resident of the state of California, I’m starting to realize that I am not really ready to deal with EVERY problem.  A large earthquake is going to hit California in the near future,  a fact confirmed recently by scientists and researchers. So how should I react when it happens?

The Earthquake Flowchart I made

The Earthquake Flowchart I made

This is the question I asked myself last week, to which I had no definitive answer. Unlike many other dangerous situations, watching episodes of MacGyver had not prepared me for an earthquake. Therefore, I decided to search the net for earthquake safety tips. I have distilled my findings into the following blog post.  Continue reading

In your community, are there any plans specific to evacuating disabled individuals?
In New York City, the answer is no.

WheelchairQuestion

What’s The Problem?
New Yorkers are in federal court arguing that the city needs disaster evacuation planning specifically for the disabled.  Numerous complaints were received after Hurricane Sandy by disabled residents who were unable to access evacuation vehicles, shelters, or resources. According to the CDC, this is a widespread issue, as about 50 million Americans, or roughly 20% of the population have disabilities or access needs. It is clear that disabled individuals may need special consideration during evacuation and recovery. So why aren’t we building their needs into disaster planning? And what can you be doing as a resident or government official to help?

How Can Recovers Help?

For individual residents, our new preparedness platform (currently called ‘Ready‘) provides disabled individuals with information specific to their situation and location such as: Continue reading